Composer Libby Larsen Reads Bill Holm

In this episode, composer Libby Larsen reads “Wolf Song in Los Angeles” by Bill Holm. Larsen is one of the most prolific and most performed living American composers. Bill Holm (1943 – 2009) was a poet and essayist who lived in western Minnesota. Throughout the episode, you’ll hear excerpts from Larsen’s musical setting of “Wolf Song in Los Angeles” – performed by Clara Osowski, with piano accompaniment by Casey Rafn.

“Wolf Song in Los Angeles” by Bill Holm appears in the collection The Dead Get by With Everything, published by Milkweed Editions.

Keep up with Libby Larsen on Facebook and libbylarsen.com.

Keep up with Clara Osowski on Twitter, Facebook, and claraosowski.com.

We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

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Journalist Krista Tippett Reads Rainer Maria Rilke

Krista Tippett

In this episode, On Being Project founder and CEO Krista Tippett reads “God speaks to each of us as he makes us” by Rainer Maria Rilke. She shares how the poem gave her courage and resolve during the creation of her public radio show, Speaking of Faith, in 2003. In the years since, Speaking of Faith has grown and evolved into The On Being Project, a media and public life initiative exploring the intersection of spiritual inquiry, science, social healing, community, poetry, and the arts. Tippett’s latest book is Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living.

“God speaks to each of us as he makes us” by Rainer Maria Rilke appears in the collection Rilke’s Book of Hours: Love Poems to God, translated by Anita Barrows and Joanna Macy, and published by Riverhead Books.

Keep up with Krista Tippett on Twitter and onbeing.org.

We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Subscribe on RadioPubliciTunes, Spotify, or Stitcher.

Representative Ilhan Omar Reads Warsan Shire

In this episode, U.S. Representative Ilhan Omar reads “Conversations about home (at the deportation centre)” by Warsan Shire and reflects on the many meanings of home. On November 6, 2018, Omar became the first Somali American, and one of the first two Muslim women elected to U.S. Congress. She represents Minnesota’s 5th congressional district. This interview was recorded in 2017, when Omar was still serving in the Minnesota State House of Representatives.

“Conversations about home (at the deportation centre),” by Warsan Shire, appears in the pamphlet, Teaching My Mother How to Give Birth, from Flipped Eye Publishing.

Keep up with Ilhan Omar on TwitterFacebook, and ilhanomar.com.

As always, the Haiku Hotline (612-440-0643) is open for your short poems and poetic musings.

Follow us on TwitterFacebook, and Instagram.

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Entomologist Marla Spivak Reads Rumi

Marla Spivak

In this episode, entomologist Dr. Marla Spivak reads “When Grapes Turn to Wine” by Rumi and discusses how Rumi can teach us to “think like bee.” Dr. Spivak is a MacArthur “genius” Fellow known for her groundbreaking research on bee behavior and biology.

“When Grapes Turn to Wine” by Rumi, translated by Robert Bly, appears in the book If Bees Are Few: A Hive of Bee Poems, published by University of Minnesota Press. A portion of all proceeds from the book are donated to support research at the University of Minnesota Bee Lab.

We feature one listener haiku at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Subscribe on RadioPubliciTunes, Spotify, or Stitcher.

Playwright Harrison David Rivers Reads Essex Hemphill

Harrison David Rivers

In this episode, playwright Harrison David Rivers reads “For My Own Protection” by Essex Hemphill and discusses the use of the poem in his recent play, This Bitter Earth. Rivers is the recipient of fellowships from the McKnight and Jerome Foundations and is a core writer at the Playwright’s Center.

“For My Own Protection” by Essex Hemphill appears in the collection Ceremonies, published by Plume.

Keep up with Harrison David Rivers at harrisondavidrivers.com

We feature one listener haiku at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Subscribe on RadioPubliciTunes, Spotify, or Stitcher.