Songwriter Grian Chatten (Fontaines D.C.) Reads Gerard Manley Hopkins

In this episode, Grian Chatten reads “The Windhover” by Gerard Manley Hopkins. Chatten is the frontman of the Irish post-punk band Fontaines D.C., recently described by NME as “the new heroes of the rock resurrection.” The members of the group met while attending music college in Dublin and initially bonded over a shared love for Irish literature. Their second album, A Hero’s Death, has been nominated for a 2021 Grammy Award for Best Rock Album.

Gerard Manley Hopkins was an English poet and Jesuit priest who spent the last years of his life as a professor of Greek and Latin at University College Dublin. His poems were not published until 30 years after his death in 1889.

“The Windhover” by Gerard Manley Hopkins appears in Gerard Manley Hopkins: The Major Works, published by Oxford University Press.

Keep up with Fontaines D.C. on TwitterInstagram, and at fontainesdc.com. Click here to watch the music video for “Big,” the song heard briefly at the beginning of this episode.

We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

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Photographer Alec Soth Reads Wallace Stevens

Alec Soth

In this episode, Alec Soth reads “Of Modern Poetry” by Wallace Stevens. Soth is a photographer based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He has published over twenty-five books and has been called a “living legend” and “one of the most important photographers working today” by the Washington Post.

Soth’s recent photo book, I Know How Furiously Your Heart is Beating, is a stunning collection of portraits and interiors from around the world. Soth has described the collection as an attempt to “strip the [photographic] medium down to it’s primary elements.” The collection takes its title from an early poem by the American modernist Wallace Stevens, whose meditations on poetry and aesthetics have helped shape Soth’s understanding of his own work.

“Of Modern Poetry” by Wallace Stevens appears in The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens, published by Vintage.

Keep up with Alec Soth on Instagram and at alecsoth.com. His new collaborative book with C. Fausto Cabrera is available here for preorder.

We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Subscribe on RadioPubliciTunesSpotify, or Stitcher.

Counselor Sheryl Paul Reads Walt Whitman

Sheryl Paul

In this episode, Sheryl Paul reads from “Song of Myself” by Walt Whitman. Paul is a counselor working in the tradition of Jungian depth psychology. She runs the popular blog and website, Conscious Transitions, and is the author, most recently, of The Wisdom of Anxiety: How Worry & Intrusive Thoughts Are Gifts to Help You Heal. Paul writes of anxiety not as a disorder to be eradicated, but as a wise messenger from the unconscious and an invitation to self-trust.

A key companion on Paul’s own journey to self-trust has been the legendary American poet Walt Whitman. His 52-part epic, “Song of Myself”, first published in the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass, is among the most beloved and influential poems in the American tradition.

Keep up with Sheryl Paul on Instagram, Facebook, and at conscious-transitions.com.

We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Subscribe on RadioPubliciTunesSpotify, or Stitcher.

Filmmaker Jennifer Crandall Reads Mark Strand

In this episode, Jennifer Crandall reads “Keeping Things Whole” by Mark Strand. Crandall is a documentary filmmaker and journalist. She is the creator, most recently, of Whitman, Alabama – a must-watch web series in which Alabama residents recite passages from Walt Whitman’s poem, “Song of Myself.” Crandall has described the project as “an experiment in using documentary and poetry to reveal the threads that tie us together — as people, as states, and as a nation.”

“Keeping Things Whole” by Mark Strand appears in the volume, Collected Poems, published by Alfred A Knopf.

Keep up with Jennifer Crandall on Twitter and at jenncrandall.com.

We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Subscribe on RadioPubliciTunesSpotify, or Stitcher.

Biblical Translator Robert Alter Reads the Song of Songs

In this episode, Robert Alter reads from his translation of the Song of Songs. Alter is a literary critic and translator based at the University of California, Berkeley. In 2018, he published a landmark, one-man translation of the entire Hebrew Bible – the culmination of over two decades of scholarship.

The Song of Songs – sometimes referred to as the Song of Solomon – is a book of the Hebrew Bible, typically dated to the 4th century BCE.

The Song of Songs, 4:8 – 5:1, translated by Robert Alter, appears in The Hebrew Bible: A Translation with Commentary published W.W. Norton & Company.

We feature one short listener contribution at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read something after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Subscribe on RadioPubliciTunesSpotify, or Stitcher.