Photographer Alec Soth Reads Wallace Stevens

Alec Soth

In this episode, Alec Soth reads “Of Modern Poetry” by Wallace Stevens. Soth is a photographer based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He has published over twenty-five books and has been called a “living legend” and “one of the most important photographers working today” by the Washington Post.

Soth’s recent photo book, I Know How Furiously Your Heart is Beating, is a stunning collection of portraits and interiors from around the world. Soth has described the collection as an attempt to “strip the [photographic] medium down to it’s primary elements.” The collection takes its title from an early poem by the American modernist Wallace Stevens, whose meditations on poetry and aesthetics have helped shape Soth’s understanding of his own work.

“Of Modern Poetry” by Wallace Stevens appears in The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens, published by Vintage.

Keep up with Alec Soth on Instagram and at alecsoth.com. His new collaborative book with C. Fausto Cabrera is available here for preorder.

We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

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Counselor Sheryl Paul Reads Walt Whitman

Sheryl Paul

In this episode, Sheryl Paul reads from “Song of Myself” by Walt Whitman. Paul is a counselor working in the tradition of Jungian depth psychology. She runs the popular blog and website, Conscious Transitions, and is the author, most recently, of The Wisdom of Anxiety: How Worry & Intrusive Thoughts Are Gifts to Help You Heal. Paul writes of anxiety not as a disorder to be eradicated, but as a wise messenger from the unconscious and an invitation to self-trust.

A key companion on Paul’s own journey to self-trust has been the legendary American poet Walt Whitman. His 52-part epic, “Song of Myself”, first published in the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass, is among the most beloved and influential poems in the American tradition.

Keep up with Sheryl Paul on Instagram, Facebook, and at conscious-transitions.com.

We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Subscribe on RadioPubliciTunesSpotify, or Stitcher.

Filmmaker Jennifer Crandall Reads Mark Strand

In this episode, Jennifer Crandall reads “Keeping Things Whole” by Mark Strand. Crandall is a documentary filmmaker and journalist. She is the creator, most recently, of Whitman, Alabama – a must-watch web series in which Alabama residents recite passages from Walt Whitman’s poem, “Song of Myself.” Crandall has described the project as “an experiment in using documentary and poetry to reveal the threads that tie us together — as people, as states, and as a nation.”

“Keeping Things Whole” by Mark Strand appears in the volume, Collected Poems, published by Alfred A Knopf.

Keep up with Jennifer Crandall on Twitter and at jenncrandall.com.

We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Subscribe on RadioPubliciTunesSpotify, or Stitcher.

Painter Enrique Martínez Celaya Reads Miguel Hernández

enrique martinez celaya

In this episode, Enrique Martínez Celaya reads “Elegy for Ramón Sijé” by Miguel Hernández. Martínez Celaya is a world-renowned painter, sculptor, and the author of On Art & Mindfulness, among other books. He lives and works in Los Angeles.

Miguel Hernández (1910-1942) was an early 20th-century Spanish poet. The elegy featured in this episode was written after the death of his close friend and mentor, Ramón Sijé, in 1935.

The score heard throughout this episode was created using samples from a musical setting of the poem by Spanish singer-songwriter Joan Manuel Serrat.

“Elegy for Ramón Sijé” by Miguel Hernández, translated by Edwin Honig, appears in the book The Unending Lightning, published by Sheep Meadow Press.

Keep up with Enrique Martínez Celaya on Facebook and www.martinezcelaya.com.

We feature one short listener contribution at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read something after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

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Playwright Harrison David Rivers Reads Essex Hemphill

Harrison David Rivers

In this episode, playwright Harrison David Rivers reads “For My Own Protection” by Essex Hemphill and discusses the use of the poem in his recent play, This Bitter Earth. Rivers is the recipient of fellowships from the McKnight and Jerome Foundations and is a core writer at the Playwright’s Center.

“For My Own Protection” by Essex Hemphill appears in the collection Ceremonies, published by Plume.

Keep up with Harrison David Rivers at harrisondavidrivers.com

We feature one listener haiku at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Subscribe on RadioPubliciTunes, Spotify, or Stitcher.