Songwriter Grian Chatten (Fontaines D.C.) Reads Gerard Manley Hopkins

In this episode, Grian Chatten reads “The Windhover” by Gerard Manley Hopkins. Chatten is the frontman of the Irish post-punk band Fontaines D.C., recently described by NME as “the new heroes of the rock resurrection.” The members of the group met while attending music college in Dublin and initially bonded over a shared love for Irish literature. Their second album, A Hero’s Death, has been nominated for a 2021 Grammy Award for Best Rock Album.

Gerard Manley Hopkins was an English poet and Jesuit priest who spent the last years of his life as a professor of Greek and Latin at University College Dublin. His poems were not published until 30 years after his death in 1889.

“The Windhover” by Gerard Manley Hopkins appears in Gerard Manley Hopkins: The Major Works, published by Oxford University Press.

Keep up with Fontaines D.C. on TwitterInstagram, and at fontainesdc.com. Click here to watch the music video for “Big,” the song heard briefly at the beginning of this episode.

We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Subscribe on RadioPublicApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

Photographer Alec Soth Reads Wallace Stevens

Alec Soth

In this episode, Alec Soth reads “Of Modern Poetry” by Wallace Stevens. Soth is a photographer based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He has published over twenty-five books and has been called a “living legend” and “one of the most important photographers working today” by the Washington Post.

Soth’s recent photo book, I Know How Furiously Your Heart is Beating, is a stunning collection of portraits and interiors from around the world. Soth has described the collection as an attempt to “strip the [photographic] medium down to it’s primary elements.” The collection takes its title from an early poem by the American modernist Wallace Stevens, whose meditations on poetry and aesthetics have helped shape Soth’s understanding of his own work.

“Of Modern Poetry” by Wallace Stevens appears in The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens, published by Vintage.

Keep up with Alec Soth on Instagram and at alecsoth.com. His new collaborative book with C. Fausto Cabrera is available here for preorder.

We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Subscribe on RadioPubliciTunesSpotify, or Stitcher.

Novelist Chris Kraus Reads Steve Levine

Chris Kraus

In this episode, writer Chris Kraus reads “Miserable Life” by Steve Levine and discusses how New York School poetry influenced the development of her distinctive style. Kraus is the author of I Love Dick (now an Amazon Original Series) and, most recently, After Kathy Acker.

“Miserable Life” is used by permission from To and For (Coffee House Press, 1992). Copyright © 1992 by Steve Levine.

Keep up with Chris Kraus’ latest releases at Semiotext(e).

We feature one listener haiku at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Subscribe on iTunesStitcher, Spotify, or RadioPublic.

Chef Amy Thielen Reads Jim Harrison

In this episode, Amy Thielen reads “Death Again” by Jim Harrison and explores the relationship between great food and great literature. Amy Thielen is a chef and two-time James Beard Award-winning writer. She’s the author of The New Midwestern Table (a cookbook) and Give a Girl a Knife (a memoir). She’s also the host of Heartland Table on Food Network.

“Death Again” by Jim Harrison appears in Songs of Unreason, published by Copper Canyon Press.

Keep up with Amy Thielen on Twitter, Facebook, and at amythielen.com.

We feature one listener haiku at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Subscribe on RadioPubliciTunes, Spotify, or Stitcher.

DJ Rekha Reads Audre Lorde

DJ Rekha

In this episode, DJ Rekha reads “A Litany for Survival” by Audre Lorde and discusses dancing as an antidote to fear. DJ Rekha is a producer, curator, and educator based in New York City. Her classic debut album, DJ Rekha presents Basement Bhangra, was released in 2007. Her monthly party, Basement Bhangra, ran from 1997 to the summer of 2017 – making it one of the most influential and longest continuously running parties in NYC history.

“A Litany for Survival” by Audrey Lorde appears in The Black Unicorn, published by W.W. Norton & Company.

Keep up with DJ Rekha on Twitter, Facebook, and at djrekha.com.

We feature one listener haiku at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Subscribe on RadioPubliciTunes, Spotify, or Stitcher.